"A win-win situation for farmers and for families across the state as we try to provide more access and easier access to locally grown, fresh farm products."
- Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

What is Grown in New York

In addition to providing economic benefits to farmers, farmers’ markets can provide nutritional benefits to New Yorkers by improving access to the nutritional benefits of fresh produce. For help choosing healthy, good-for-you produce:

  • Check out this guide to when New York produce is typically harvested and available,
  • Look for nutrition information and demonstrations at your local farmers’ market, and
  • Use the charts below to learn more about the nutritional benefits of New York fruits and vegetables and about how to select and store them.


Fruits Grown in New York

About 2,500 known varieties of apples are grown in the United States. More than 7,500 are grown worldwide.

How to Select: Choose firm, shiny, smooth-skinned apples with intact stems. Should smell fresh, not musty.
How to Store: Refrigerate apples in plastic bag away from strong-odored foods. Use within 3 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; high source of dietary fiber

Apricots are often crossed with plums to provide pluots (mostly plum), plumcots (equal plum and apricot) and apriums (mostly apricot).

How to Select: Choose apricots that are plump, firm and uniformly colored.
How to Store: Store apricots at room temperature until ripe then in the refrigerator in a plastic
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C, good source of potassium and fiber.

Blackberries are different from black raspberries. They taste different and they have a solid center, while raspberries are hollow when picked.

How to Select: Choose blackberries that are shiny and not bruised or leaking.
How to Store: Refrigerate blackberries for 3-6 days; wash just before using.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free and an excellent source of vitamin C and fiber.

Early American colonists made grey paint by boiling blueberries in milk.

How to Select: Choose firm, plump, dry blueberries with dusty blue color and uniform in size.
How to Store: Refrigerate blueberries for 10 days to 14 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Refrigerate blueberries for 10 days to 14 days.

Cantaloupes are named for the papal gardens of Cantalupo, Italy, where some historians say this species of melon was first grown.

How to Select: Choose fragrant, symmetrical cantaloupes, heavy for size with no visible bruises and yellow or cream undertone. Stem end should give to gentle pressure.
How to Store: Store uncut cantaloupes at room temperature for up to 1 week. Refrigerate cut melon in airtight container up to 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; high in vitamin A; high in vitamin C; good source of folate.

Cherries are not native to this country. The fruit was brought to America by ship with early settlers in the 1600s.

How to Select: Select firm, red cherries with stems attached. Avoid soft, shriveled or blemished cherries.
How to Store: Refrigerate cherries for up to 10 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C; good source of potassium.

The Concord grape is the only variety native to North America. All other varieties grown here were started from imported vines.

How to Select: Choose plump, firm grapes that are firmly attached to the stem.
How to Store: Store grapes in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free.

Like most melons, honeydews taste better if left unrefrigerated for a few days.

How to Select: Choose well shaped honeydew melons that are nearly spherical. Should have a waxy, not fuzzy surface and feel heavy for size.
How to Store: Store honeydew melons in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C.

How to Select: Choose peaches with firm, fuzzy skins that yield to gentle pressure when ripe.
How to Store: Store unripe peaches in paper bag. When ripe, store at room temperature for use within 1-2 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C.

Pears have been cultivated for nearly four thousand years.

How to Select: Chose firm pears, then "Check the Neck for Ripeness"™ daily by applying gentle pressure to the stem end of the pear with your thumb. When it yields to the pressure, it’s ready to eat.
How to Store: Store unripened pears in paper bag at room temperature. Refrigerate ripe pears.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; excellent source of dietary fiber; good source of vitamin C.

Plum trees were brought to California from Asia in the 1870’s.

How to Select: Choose plump plums with smooth skins. Avoid bruises and soft spots.
How to Store: Store unripe plums in paper bag until ripe. Refrigerate ripe plums.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C.

Raspberries come in many colors besides red. There are also black, purple and gold raspberries.

How to Select: Choose dry, plump, firm raspberries. Avoid wet or moldy berries.
How to Store: Do not wash raspberries until ready to eat. Refrigerate for use within 1-2 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; cholesterol free; high in dietary fiber; high in vitamin C.

Sour cherries are often used for pies, preserves, syrups and sauces and pair well with meats. Dried cherries are good additions to salads, stews and rice dishes. Some people enjoy the tart flavor of fresh cherries.

How to Select: Choose cherries that are clean, bright, plump and shiny without blemishes.
How to Store: Store sour cherries unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 2-3 days or rinse, remove seeds then freeze for later use.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, excellent source of vitamins A and C and a good source of fiber.

On average, there are 200 tiny seeds on every strawberry.

How to Select: Choose shiny, firm strawberries with a bright red color. Caps should be fresh, green and intact. Avoid shriveled, mushy or leaky berries.
How to Store: Do not wash strawberries until ready to eat. Store in refrigerator for 1-3 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C; high in folate.

On average, there are 200 tiny seeds on every strawberry.

How to Select: Choose symmetrical watermelons with dried stems and yellowish undersides, heavy for size.
How to Store: Store whole watermelons at room temperature. Refrigerate cut watermelons in airtight container for use within 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; high in vitamin A; high in vitamin C.

Vegetables Grown in New York

Acorn squash is a type of winter squash that was named for its acorn-like shape. Acorn squash come in a variety of colors including: yellow, dark green, tan, and orange.

How to Select: Select acorn squash that are dull and heavy for their size. Avoid squash with soft spots or cracks.
How to Store: Store acorn squash in a cool, dry area away from extreme temperatures and sunlight. Acorn squash can stay fresh for up to 3 months.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free and a good source of vitamin C.

Also called Rocket, this is a peppery green very popular in Mediterranean dishes.

How to Select: Look for bright green leaves that are delicately crisp, and stems that are neither withered nor slimy.
How to Store: Loosely wrap Arugula in damp paper towels and place in a plastic bag for up to 3 days in the refrigerator.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat, cholesterol free, very low sodium, good source of folate and calcium, excellent source of vitamins A and C.

Asparagus folklore credits these delicious green spears with everything from curing toothaches to being a reproductive tonic!

How to Select: Choose odorless asparagus stalks with dry, tight tips. Avoid limp or wilted stalks.
How to Store: Refrigerate asparagus for up to four days by wrapping ends of stalks
in wet paper towel and placing in plastic bag.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; low calorie; good source of vitamin C; high in folate; good source of vitamin A.

Beets are deep red, or white in color. Sugar is produced from one variety (Sugar Beets) and the red color is used in food coloring. They may be eaten raw or cooked.

How to Select: Choose beets with firm, smooth skins and non-wilted leaves if still attached. Smaller ones are more tender.
How to Store: Remove leaves, leaving about an inch of the stems. Use leaves as greens- raw or cooked. Store roots in a plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. Wash before cooking.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium, excellent source of folate.

Peppers, both sweet and hot, originated in Central and South America. They were not introduced into Europe until the 16th century.

How to Select: Choose firm, brightly colored peppers with tight skin that are heavy for their size. Avoid dull, shriveled or pitted peppers.
How to Store: Refrigerate bell peppers in plastic bag for use within 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin C.

Bok Choy is also called Chinese cabbage and pak-choi and has been grown in China for more than 6,000 years! It can be eaten raw or cooked.

How to Select: Choose firm bok choy stalks without brown spots and fresh leaves (not wilted).
How to Store: Store bok choy in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for up to a week. Wash immediately before serving.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C and a good source of folate.

This yummy veggie is worth 12 points when playing Scrabble.

How to Select: Choose firm bok choy stalks without brown spots and fresh leaves (not wilted).
How to Store: Refrigerate broccoli and use within 3-5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat; saturated fat free; low sodium; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C; high in folate; good source of dietary fiber; good source of potassium.

Broccoli Rabe is also called Broccoli Raab and Rapini. Blanch before cooking to make it less bitter.

How to Select: Choose firm, green, small stems with compact heads. The florets should be tightly closed and dark green, not open or yellow. Avoid ones with leaves that are wilted or yellowing.
How to Store: Store broccoli rabe in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, excellent source of Vitamins A and C.

These veggies aren’t really baby cabbages, but are in the same plant family.

How to Select: Choose firm, compact, bright green brussels sprouts heads.
Buy on stalk when possible.
How to Store: Refrigerate brussels sprouts in plastic bag up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; good source of dietary fiber; high in vitamin C; good source of folate.

Butter lettuces include Boston and Bibb varieties. As its name implies, these lettuces have a slightly sweet, almost buttery taste.

How to Select: Avoid butter lettuce heads with wilted leaves.
How to Store: Store washed and dried lettuce in the refrigerator in plastic bag for up to five days. Store living lettuce in its original container and rinse immediately before using.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, excellent source of vitamin A, good source of vitamin C and folate.

Buttercup squash is a winter squash that has a sweet and creamy orange flesh and is considered much sweeter than other winter varieties. Seeds from buttercup squash (as well as all winter squashes) make a great snack food, just like pumpkin seeds.

How to Select: Select a squash that is firm, heavy for its size and has an even cream color. Avoid squashes that have soft spots, dull and wrinkled skin or that are extremely light for their size.
How to Store: Store squash in a cool dry place for up to 3 months.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free and a good source of vitamin C.

Easily found in supermarkets today, this winter squash variety is fairly new to consumers; it wasn’t introduced commercially until 1944. Butternut squash can be used as a substitute in any recipe that calls for pumpkin.

How to Select: Choose squash that is heavy for its size.
How to Store: Store butternut squash in a cool, dark place for up to a month. Once cut, refrigerate unused portion.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, good source of fiber, potassium and magnesium, excellent source of vitamins A and C.

Carrots are not always orange and can also be found in purple, white, red or yellow. Carrots were the first vegetable to be canned commercially.

How to Select: Choose well-shaped, smooth, firm, crisp carrots with deep color and fresh, green tops. Avoid soft, wilted or split carrots.
How to Store: Refrigerate carrots in plastic bag with tops removed up to 2 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; low sodium; cholesterol free; excellent source of vitamin A; good source of vitamin C; low calorie.

Not all cauliflower is white! Try purple and orange cauliflower too.

How to Select: Choose cauliflower with compact, creamy white curds and bright green, firmly attached leaves. Avoid brown spots or loose sections that are spread out.
How to Store: Refrigerate cauliflower in plastic bag up to 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin C; good source of folate.

The wild form of celery is known as smallage. It has a bitter taste, and the stalks are stringier than cultivated celery. Smallage was used in ancient times as a medicine, and the Romans used it as a seasoning. It was in the 17th and 18th centuries that celery was developed by breeding the bitterness out of smallage.

How to Select: Choose straight, rigid celery stalks with fresh leaves. Avoid pithy, woody or limp stalks. Should smell fresh, not musty.
How to Store: Refrigerate celery in a plastic bag for a week or more.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; good source of vitamin C; good source of vitamin A.

The cherry tomato is very versatile. Drizzle with a favorite dressing or vinaigrette or add to stir-fry recipes. Enjoy by the handful, with fresh herbs (such as dill weed, parsley, curry, oregano, chili powder, bay leaves, mint, thyme and garlic), or as an attractive edible garnish. They are also perfect as an appetizer for any social event!

How to Select: Choose plump tomatoes with smooth skins that are free from bruises, cracks, or blemishes.
How to Store: Store at room temperature away from direct sunlight. Use within 1 week after ripe. Tomatoes taste best if not refrigerated; refrigerate only if you can’t use them before they spoil.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low in sodium, an excellent source of vitamins A and C and a good source of vitamin K and potassium.

Collard greens are a member of the cabbage family. They grow as a loose bouquet instead of in a tight “head” like other cabbages. Traditionally slow cooked with pork, they can also be quick cooked like cabbage. me and garlic), or as an attractive edible garnish. They are also perfect as an appetizer for any social event!

How to Select: Choose bunches with dark green leaves with no yellowing.
How to Store: Refrigerate collard greens in a plastic bag for up to 5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, low in calories, excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C and folate; good source of calcium and fiber.

The average ear of corn has 800 kernels, arranged in 16 rows. There is one piece of silk for each kernel.

How to Select: Choose ears with green husks, fresh silks and tight rows of kernels.
How to Store: Refrigerate corn with husks on for use as soon as possible or within 1-2 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C.

Generally eaten raw, cucumbers can be sauteed and served warm with a little chopped dill as a side dish.

How to Select: Choose firm, well shaped cucumbers with dark green color, heavy for size.
How to Store: Refrigerate cucumbers in plastic bag up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; low calorie; good source of vitamin C.

The Daikon Radish is a long, white, slender vegetable that is widely used throughout Asia.

How to Select: Skin should be shiny, firm, and smooth with crisp roots. Avoid radishes with cracks and bruises.
How to Store: Wrap daikon radish tightly in plastic and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Daikon radish is very low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol free, good source of vitamin C.

Eggplant is a member of the nightshade or potato family, which also includes tomatoes and hot peppers. Many useful medicines are derived from this family. Eggplants can be purple, green, white or striped, pear-shaped or cylindrical and the size of a golf ball to a football. They are often used as a meat substitute.

How to Select: Choose eggplants that are heavy for their size and without cracks or discolorations.
How to Store: Store eggplants in the refrigerator crisper drawer. Use within 5-7 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, low in calories, good source of dietary fiber.

Endive is very closely related to the dandelion plant.

How to Select: Select endive heads that are crisp and bright green. Avoid heads with wilted or browning leaves.
How to Store: Endive should be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low in sodium, excellent source of fiber. It is also a good source of vitamin C, calcium, iron, phosphorus and potassium.

Fennel is sometimes called “sweet anise” and has a delicate licorice flavor. The feathery tops can be used as an herb.

How to Select: Choose firm, unblemished fennel bulbs with bright green leaves.
How to Store: Refrigerate fennel in a plastic bag up to five (5) days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fennel is fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium, good source of vitamin C, potassium and fiber.

The majority of garlic (90%) grown in the United States comes from California.

How to Select: Choose garlic that is plump, dry and firm. Fresh garlic should be white to off-white.
How to Store: Garlic should be stored in a cool, dark place, but not in the refrigerator, and can be kept for several weeks. Clay garlic holders can be used as well.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free.

Also known as string beans, these bright green and crunchy beans are available year-round. Green beans are picked while still immature and the inner bean is just beginning to form. They are one of only a few varieties of beans that are eaten fresh.

How to Select: Choose fresh, well colored beans that snap easily when bent.
How to Store: Refrigerate green beans in plastic bag, use within 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; low calorie; good source of fiber; good source of vitamin C.

More than 400 varieties of cabbage are enjoyed worldwide.

How to Select: Choose cabbage heads with compact leaves that are heavy for their size.
How to Store: Refrigerate cabbage for up to 7 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; low-calorie; high in vitamin C.

Kale is a member of the cabbage family that is very popular in Northern Europe.It was so popular in Scotland that being invited to “come to kale” was an invitation to dinner.

How to Select: Choose dark colored kale bunches with small to medium leaves. Avoid brown or yellow leaves.
How to Store: Store kale in a plastic bag in the coldest part of the fridge for 3-5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium, excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C, good source of calcium and potassium.

The term Leaf Lettuce describes the varieties of lettuce with leaves that branch from a single stalk in a loose bunch rather than forming a tight head. The leaves are crisper and more full-flavored than those of the Head Lettuce varieties.

How to Select: Choose lettuce with crisp leaves. Avoid brown edges.
How to Store: After purchase, rinse well and dry with paper towels.
Refrigerate leaf lettuce in plastic bag up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin A; good source of folate.

The leek is a member of the onion family but has a sweeter, more subtle flavor than an onion. It can be eaten raw or cooked but the green tops are usually not eaten.

How to Select: Choose firm, crisp stalks with as much white and light green regions as possible. Avoid leeks with yellow or withered tops.
How to Store: Refrigerate unwashed leeks in plastic bag for up to two weeks. Rinse before using.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, excellent source of vitamin A, good source of vitamin C and folate.

Mustard greens are the most pungent of the cooking greens and lend a peppery flavor to food. They originated in the Himalayan region of India more than 5,000 years ago.

How to Select: Look for a green color with leaves that don’t have blemishes or show any yellowing or withering. Mustard greens should have stems that look freshly cut that aren’t thick, dried out, browned, or split.
How to Store: Discard any bruised or yellow leaves and remove any bands or ties that hold bunches together. Gently wrap unwashed mustard greens in paper towels and store loosely in plastic bags. Keep moist and cool in the lower part of the refrigerator in the high-humidity bin. Store for up to five days.
Nutrition Benefits: Mustard greens are fat free, saturated fat free, low sodium, cholesterol free, good source of fiber. Excellent source of vitamin A, C and K, folate and manganese.

People have been eating onions since prehistoric times.

How to Select: Choose onions that are firm and dry with bright, smooth outer skins.
How to Store: Store whole onions in a cool, dark, well ventilated place for use within 4 weeks. Refrigerate cut onions in a tightly sealed container for use within 2-3 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C; good source of dietary fiber.

Parsnips are sweetest after a frost. In Europe they were used to sweeten jams and cakes before sugar became widely available.

How to Select: Choose parsnips that are firm and dry without pits. Smaller ones may be more flavorful and tender.
How to Store: Refrigerate parsnips unwashed in an unsealed bag for 3 weeks or more.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, good source of vitamin C, folate and fiber.

Green peas, also called Sweet or English peas, grow on vines which are often supported by a pole. They can be eaten raw or cooked. Gregor Mendel, the “Father of Genetics” formulated his theories while studying peas.

How to Select: Choose firm, bright green, medium-sized pods with no signs of decay or wilting.
How to Store: Refrigerate peas in a perforated plastic bag for 3-5 days. Shell peas immediately before using.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, excellent source of vitamin C, good source of vitamin A, folate and dietary fiber.

According to USDA, each American eats 140 pounds of potatoes a year.

How to Select: All potato varieties should be clean, firm, smooth, dry and uniform in size.
How to Store: Store potatoes in a cool, dark, well ventilated place for use within 3-5 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; high in vitamin C; good source of potassium.

The pumpkin is indigenous to North America. Halloween pumpkins are edible and the source of canned pumpkin.

How to Select: Select pumpkins that are firm and heavy for their size.
How to Store: Store pumpkins in a cool, dark place for up to two months.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, good source of vitamin C, excellent source of vitamin A.

This veggie’s greens can be eaten too, either cooked or raw.

How to Select: Choose smooth, brightly colored, medium sized radishes. Attached tops should be green and fresh looking.
How to Store: Refrigerate radishes in plastic bag for use within 1 week.
Remove tops before storing.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin C.

Rhubarb is an early sign of spring. It originated in Western China and was prized for its medicinal qualities. The stalk is very tart-the leaves should NEVER be eaten.

How to Select: Choose flat stalks that are not curled or limp. Deep red stalks are sweeter and richer; tenderness is not related to size.
How to Store: Refrigerate rhubarb in a plastic bag; use within a few days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, low in calories, good source of vitamin C.

Rutabagas, also known as Swede or yellow turnips, look a lot like turnips! They are larger than turnips, pale yellow (instead of white) and are often waxed to prevent dehydration. They are sweeter than turnips and turn slightly orange when cooked.

How to Select: Choose rutabagas that are heavy for their size and free of soft spots or cracks.
How to Store: Refrigerate rutabagas in a plastic bag for up to 3 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, excellent source of vitamin C.

Spinach was first cultivated over 2,000 years ago in Iran. By 1806, it had become a popular vegetable in America and in the 1920’s the U.S. pushed spinach commercially, with the Popeye the Sailorman cartoon becoming a great advocate for spinach consumption. Spinach is eaten raw in salads and also as a cooked green much like turnip greens or collard greens.

How to Select: Choose fresh, crisp, green bunches with no evidence of insect damage.
How to Store: Loosely wrap spinach in damp paper towel. Refrigerate in plastic bag for use within 3-5 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in dietary fiber; excellent source of fiber; high in vitamin A; high in vitamin C; high in iron, high in folate; good source of magnesium.

Squash are fleshy vegetables protected by a hard rind. They belong to the plant family that includes melons and cucumbers.

How to Select: For all squash varieties, choose glossy, small- to medium-sized squash, heavy for size.
How to Store: Refrigerate summer squash for use within 3-4 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin C.

Select chard with fresh green leaves; avoid those that are yellow or discolored.

How to Select: Store unwashed leaves in plastic bags in the crisper in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.
How to Store: Refrigerate summer squash for use within 3-4 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, good source of magnesium, excellent source vitamins A and C.

Also known as the Tomate Verde and Mexican Husk Tomato, the Tomatillo is a staple in Mexican salsa and mole. As it matures, the fruit fills, and sometimes bursts through its papery husk.

How to Select: Look for dry, hard tomatillos with tightly fitting husks that are dry and free of mold.
How to Store: Refrigerate tomatillos loose or in an open container in the crisper drawer for 2-3 weeks.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, low calorie, a good source of vitamin C.

In the same plant family as nightshade, these yummy veggies were mistakenly thought to be poisonous until the nineteenth century.

How to Select: Choose tomatoes with bright, shiny skins and firm flesh.
How to Store: Store at room temperature away from direct sunlight, for use within 1 week after ripe. Tomatoes taste best if not refrigerated; refrigerate only if you can’t use them before they spoil.
Nutrition Benefits: Low fat; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free; low calorie; high in vitamin A; high in vitamin C; good source of potassium.

Turnips come in all shapes and colors, from round to cylindrical and rose to black. They may be eaten raw or cooked.

How to Select: Select pearly, heavy turnips without soft spots and fresh leaves if still attached. Small to medium ones are sweetest.
How to Store: Store turnips in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for only a few days since they get bitter with prolonged storage.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium, excellent source of vitamin C.

The flower of zucchini plants is also edible.

How to Select: Look for zucchini with a slightly prickly, but shinny skin. The skin should be firm and free of cuts and bruises.
How to Store: Store zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days. Do not wash it until you are ready to use it. Cooked zucchini can be stored in the refrigerator as well, but should be used within 2 days.
Nutrition Benefits: Fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free, low-calorie, high in vitamin C, and a good source of manganese and molybdenum.

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November 30, 2015 Last day to use Farmers Market Nutrition Program Checks

December 15, 2015 Last day for farmers to deposit/cash FMNP checks

January 15, 2016 Last day for vendors to send in 2015 FreshConnect Checks for redemption

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